November 2015 archive

Polymer Clay Spiral Hair Wraps

| Crafts & DIY, Kids Fun

Learn how to make these quick and easy polymer clay spiral hair wraps. A great kids craft - girls will love making their own cute hair accessories.

Easy to make spiral hair wrap.

Polymer Clay Spiral Hair Wraps – Today I’m excited to show you how to make these flexible, removable polymer clay spiral hair wraps. These are ridiculously fast and easy to make. From the moment I decided to try to make these until they were ready to use was about 30 minutes. They’re so easy to make, kids can pretty much make them their selves.

There’s a back story about how these came to be actually. About a year ago my mother-in-law went to Seattle and found some sweet spiral hair wraps to give to Noelle. Noelle’s worn them but honestly I never really looked at them too closely. Then a number of weeks ago I went on a girls trip to Seattle and while we were at Pike’s Market my girlfriend found similar hair wraps for her daughter. When she showed me what she bought, she suggested I should try to figure out how to make them. So when I got home I took a look at Noelle’s hair wraps and I decided to give it a try. What do you know…these spiral hair wraps were super quick easy to make.

Polymer Clay Spiral Hair Wrap Tutorial

Supplies:

  • Polymer clay in various colors (Sculpy, Premo, Fimo, etc.) – or if you just want, you can just use one color. Apparently Sculpey has a Superflex Bake & Bend clay that would be perfect for this is you can find it.
  • wooden skewer or something of similar size
  • Cookie sheet lined with tinfoil
  • Optional: glitter to mix into the clay and beads to attach to the bottom of the spiral wrap

Directions:

  1. Choose 2-4 colors of clay and knead the clay until it’s soft and then roll the clay into little logs.
  2. Take all the logs and twist them together. Roll on a smooth flat surface.
  3. Fold over and twist again. Roll on a smooth flat surface. Keep doing this until you’re happy with the design. *Be careful not to do it too many times or it will all just turn into one color – likely grey or brown.
  4. Roll the clay smooth and until it’s about the 1/8″ in width (smaller than this will mean the spiral hair wrap will easily break) and about 12″ long (although you can make these any length you desire). Feel free to roll in a bit of glitter too if you’d like to make these extra fancy.
  5. Carefully start winding the clay around the skewer until you’ve wrapped it completely (see photo at bottom of post for example). If you’d like to add beads, etc. you can pinch one end into a little loop, otherwise, leave plain.
  6. Once you’re happy with the spiral, gently release it from the skewer and slide the clay off and onto the foil lined cookie sheet.
  7. Cook in the oven at the temperatures listed as per the clay’s instructions (mine cooked in the oven at 275 degrees °F for approximately 15 minutes). Here’s a great chart of cooking times for the various brands of polymer clays.
  8. Take out of oven, allow to cool.

Instructions to place in hair:

  1. Using a small section of hair, about the thickness of a straw, give the hair a little twist.
  2. Place the section of hair in the first channel of the spiral wrap and with one hand pinch the hair against the wrap and with the other hand begin wrapping the hair counter clockwise into each channel all the way down the shaft of the spiral wrap.
  3. Once the section of hair is in place, check to make sure it is in place by giving a little tug. If the wrap slides then redo with slightly more hair.
  4. To remove: Carefully unwind the hair section from the wrap.

NOTE: these are relatively durable but be careful not to just try pulling this out of your hair in one big yank, this will snap the hair wrap. Please do not twist or bend them excessively as this will also cause them to break. These are slightly flexible but it’s best to treat them gently.

Download your printable Polymer Clay Spiral Hair Wrap instructions here.

Looking for more crafty stuff for kids: Houses Coloring Page, Word RocksPrintable Secret Decoder WheelMandala Coloring PageRainbow Loom Perler Bead BraceletsBlank Faces Coloring PageJellyfish Friendship Bracelets10-Minute Superhero CostumePrintable Robot Coloring Page Family Movie Night Tickets

Learn how to make these quick and easy polymer clay spiral hair wraps. A great kids craft - girls will love making their own cute hair accessories.

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Outlander Cowl Crochet Pattern

| Crochet

Claire's Outlander Crochet Cowl - Free Pattern. Inspired by the knitwear on the Outlander TV series, this Sassenach Cowl is quick and easy to make, even for beginners.

Outlander Cowl Free Crochet Pattern – quick and easy to make, even for beginners.

Outlander Cowl Crochet Pattern – Three weeks ago I underwent knee surgery to fix a chronic knee problem I’d had for many years now. For the first number of days after my surgery, I was lucky enough to have my dear mother-in-law Lynda come and stay with me during the day while my husband was at work. She was a great nurse and during our time together we decided to watch a series called Outlander.

If you’re not familiar with this TV series from Starz, Outlander is a historical time travel drama based on the best-selling books by Diana Gaboldon. The storyline follows the passionate relationship between two lead characters, combat nurse Claire and the chivalrous and handsome Scottish warrior Jamie. Diana Gaboldon is one of my mother’s all-time favorite authors – at times I’m sure my father felt pangs of jealousy the way my mom would blather on and on about leading man Jamie. This American-British series takes place in Scotland during the mid-1700’s. Outlander is worth watching for the scenery and costumes alone. Their costume designer, Terry Dresbach, is simply amazing and she runs a wonderful website full of her sketches and photos of her costumes. The knitwear, in particular, is drool-worthy.

Inspired by Claire’s cowl in Outlander I decided to see if I could come up with something similar. Of course, Claire’s cowl (seen here) is knit so it’s impossible to get the exact same design and drape but I thought I’d give it a go – a great project being that I was bedridden for a couple of weeks. After a few attempts, I finally settled on this design.

It’s very easy and works up really quickly – this can be done in one evening. I loved the first one I did so much I made a second cowl with a different yarn.

The outlander cowl is very easy and works up really quickly – this can be done in one evening. I loved the first one I did so much I made a second cowl with a different yarn.

Click here to purchase an ad-free PDF of this pattern for your convenience. 

This PDF pattern also provides you with a bonus crochet tips and tricks pdf.

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  • See all my crochet patterns – HERE

OUTLANDER CROCHET COWL PATTERN

NOTES: Pattern in U.S. crochet terminology

SKILL LEVEL: EASY

MATERIALS:

  • Hook: U.S. P/11.5mm
  • Worsted weight size 4 Yarn – 2 skeins/170 yds each  (Vanna’s Choice by Lion Brand in Taupe [top photo] and Homespun by Lion Brand in Clouds [bottom photo] used in photos)
  • Darning Needle & Scissors

ABBREVIATIONS:

  • st = stitch
  • ch = chain
  • hdc = half double crochet

FINISHED SIZE:  17” tall, 28” circumference.

NOTES: Making a half double-crochet in the back loop isn’t as scary as it sounds. If you’re not familiar with crocheting this way see the photo below to help you know where to find the back loop. To crochet in the back loop of a stitch, insert your crochet hook underneath the back loop only and make your hdc as usual.

How to crochet in the back loop. The front loop is the one that is closest to you and the back loop is the one that is furthest from you when you hold your crochet work.

The front loop is the one that is closest to you and the back loop is the one that is furthest from you when you hold your crochet work.

PATTERN:

Made by holding 2 pieces of yarn together throughout the pattern.

Make a slip knot and chain 32.

ROW 1: hdc in the 3rd ch from the hook, hdc in each st across row, ch 2, turn.

ROW 2 onwards: hdc in the back loop of each st across the row, ch 2, turn. Repeat row 2 until the total length reaches 28” in length.

Finish: Carefully sew those two edges together from the inside/wrong side using the whip stitch and weave in ends.

Click here to purchase an ad-free PDF of this pattern for your convenience. 

This PDF pattern also provides you with a bonus crochet tips and tricks pdf.

Click here to purchase an ad-free PDF of this pattern for your convenience. 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this free pattern. If you’d like to get your hands on more crochet patterns check out this great book: Crocheted Scarves and Cowls: 35 colorful and contemporary crochet patterns

Looking for more great crochet patterns:  Done In A Day Baby BlanketEasy Crochet Can CozyTulip Textured Crochet Dishcloth, Colorful Solid Granny Square Dishcloth, Cross Hatch Button-Up Cowl Crochet Pattern, Easy Modern Crochet Patterns, Crochet Beach Bag Pattern, Easy Thick Crochet Wash & Dish Clothes, Crochet Boot CuffsCaps for a CauseCrochet Infinity ScarfCrochet Cat BedCrochet iPhone CaseEasy-Peasy Crochet Beanie

Claire's Outlander Crochet Cowl - Free Pattern. Inspired by the knitwear on the Outlander TV series, this Sassenach Cowl is quick and easy to make, even for beginners.

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Word Rocks

| Crafts & DIY, Kids Fun, Outdoors

Word Rocks - Paint several of rocks with inspirational words and leave them at random places for people to find. A great activity for kids. Fun for the hiders and the finders.

Paint several of rocks with inspirational words and leave them at random places for people to find.

Word Rocks – This summer we had a really neat experience being introduced to word rocks. We were staying at the lake when my friend texted us early in the morning to come for a walk. My daughter had a very late night the night before so I really didn’t want to wake her up. About an hour or so later my persistent friend texted me again saying “it’s so amazing, come for a walk.” It was a foggy, drizzly morning so I assumed she meant that the forest looked quite beautiful that morning, again, nothing I was interested in waking up my daughter for and I couldn’t leave her unattended. Eventually my daughter slowly popped her head out of bed and I was thrilled she’d had a nice long sleep. Later I made my way onto Facebook and saw that my friend had posted a collection of amazing photos of kids holding these beautiful rocks with messages written on them. She had stumbled on a treasure trail of rocks that had been decorated and adorned with lovely, inspiring messages – they were everywhere in the forest, dozens of them. Later in the day Noelle and her friend went for a walk and found tons of these little beauties. On the back of each rock was written #wordrocks. I popped on the internet and found the origins of the word rock story here. A simple and sweet project started by a mother and her son in San Diego, California.

There is so much I love about this little project. I’m a big fan of random acts of kindness and the look on the kids faces when they found the rocks was priceless. It gave them a chance to make some big decisions too…leave the rocks for others to find or keep them for themselves. We also had an opportunity to talk about what all the messages meant in depth and what that meant personally to each child. In the end, each child kept one rock that they identified most with and then took the other rocks back to hide again for others to find. It was all the kids talked about for days.

Summer has now (sadly) passed but the joy and excitement that came with finding these word rocks remains. After continually talking about it, Noelle and I decided it was time to make our own word rocks and find a place to hide them for others to receive as much fun as we did finding them the first time. We collected rocks, painted and decorated them. One afternoon while Noelle had her friend Griffyn over we decided it was time to hide our word rocks. We are blessed to live on the side of a beautiful hill called Christmas Hill in Victoria, BC. We made our way through the trails and up towards the top of the hill, hiding rocks along the way. The girls had so much fun and I really felt like they were reflecting on what they were doing. I highly recommend this fun activity to everyone. It’s fun for kids and adults alike. You never know, someone could find one of your word rocks on a day that they were really struggling and needed a little bit of kindness in their lives. Positive messages have the ability to inspire, brighten your day and enact change. Here’s a local news story from this summer about word rocks here.

How to make word rocks

Supplies:

  • rocks
  • acrylic paint
  • paint brush
  • sharpie
  • decorative pens

Directions:

  1. Wash all your rocks so that they are free of dirt and debris. Allow to dry.
  2. Apply a layer of paint to one side of your rock. Allow paint to dry.
  3. Decorate rock using more paint, sharpies and decorative pens.

Are you looking for some ideas for words and phrases to use on your word rocks?  I assembled this great list of 200 positive words and sayings. Download the list here.

Looking for more…Kids (and their parents) will love these fun 40 projects that include simple beading, sewing, felting, bookmaking, and so much more in the book Craft Camp: Over 40 Fun Projects for Kids

List of 200 positive words and phrases.

List of 200 positive words and phrases.

Hand painted word rocks.

Hand painted word rocks – hide and leave them for people to randomly find.

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