Posts Tagged ‘stripe’

Crochet Caps for a Cause Pattern

| Crafts & DIY, Crochet

Crochet Hat Pattern - great for beginners and to donate.

Crochet Beanie Pattern – great for beginners and to donate.

Crochet Caps for a Cause Pattern. Last week I had a new and exciting experience – I became a volunteer at our local hospital.  I originally created this blog to have a creative outlet but I had no idea the impact my readers would have on my life.  All the positive feedback and comments have helped me see that I have an opportunity and an obligation to give back .  My new volunteer job is to create and deliver art and activities for the pediatric and geriatric wards and to make hats and blankets for the maternity and neonatal intensive care units.  I delivered my first big package of materials and hats last week and it felt so amazing to be able to contribute to this wonderful cause.

In honour of this new endeavour in my life, I’m including the pattern for what I’m calling my “Caps for a Cause” crochet beanie.  This is a very quick and simple pattern that even beginner crocheters can easily master. I crochet pretty slowly and I can make these hats in about 45 minutes (much less time for a preemie sized hat). These hats can be made in any size from preemie all the way to men’s large so this is a very versatile pattern.

If you’re new to the world of crochet and would like some help getting started, I would suggest some of the great crochet classes offered at Craftsy.

READER CHALLENGE

I’d also like to extend a challenge for any of my readers who are so inclined to join me in this volunteer effort. Hospitals are in great need of caps for newborns, preemies, and cancer patients.  Blankets, shawls, wash clothes and toys are also in high demand. Most hospitals have volunteer programs for receiving knitted and crochet goods so I encourage  you to donate if possible – oh, and please share your experiences with me in my comments section.

Crochet Caps for a Cause Pattern – download pattern.

Materials:

  • A soft medium weight yarn. I used Red Heart Soft. Choose as many different colors as you’d like.
  • Crochet Hook – US J10/6 mm. I used this larger hook size for the baby hats so that the hats were a little more airy and stretchy but feel free to use a smaller hook if you prefer.
  • Yarn or tapestry needle
  • Scissors

Basic Hat Directions:

Ch = chain, sl st = slip stitch, sc = single crochet, dc = double crochet (U.S.)

  1. Ch 5 and then join together into a ring with a sl st (keep all your stitches loose). Or use the magic ring method if you prefer.
  2. Round 1: Ch 2 and then make 12 double crochets into the ring. Join with sl st.
  3. Round 2: Ch 2 and then 2 dc into the same stitch. Now do 2 dc in each stitch around and then sl st to join.
  4. Round 3: Ch 2, 2 dc in the first stitch then 1 dc in the next and the repeat this pattern for the entire row. Sl st to join.
  5. Round 4: Ch 2, 2 dc in the next stitch then 1 dc in the next TWO stitches and repeat in this pattern for the entire row. Sl st to join.  (*Hats for preemie babies skip to step 7 – note that hospitals ask that hats for preemie’s be a little bit longer so that they can fold back the edge of the hat)
  6. Round 5: Ch 2, 2 dc in the next stitch then 1 dc in the next THREE stitches and repeat in this pattern for the entire row. Sl st to join. (*For larger hat designs you’d just keep increasing the number of stitches between each dc by 1 until you get the size you’d like. Example: the next row would be 2 dc in the next stitch then 1 dc in the next FOUR stitches, the next row would be 2 dc in the next stitch then 1 dc in the next FIVE stitches, etc…)
  7. Rounds 6-12: Ch 2, double crochet in each stitch and join with a slip stitch.  Continue this for each row until the hat is as long as you want it. (I usually do 6 rows for my baby hats)
  8. Final row, chain 1 and then sc in each stitch and slip stitch to join (keep this last row loose or else it will make the hat too tight at the bottom).
  9. Fasten off and weave the ends into the hat using your yarn/tapestry needle.

For the striped hat design just alternate different colors for each row (and add a third colour in the second last row of dc’s if you’d like).  For the hat with the second color along the rim, change the color in your last row of dc’s and then keep that color for step 8. I really like having at least 2 colors in the hat design, it just makes it a little more exciting to look at and you can have fun coming up with contrasting colors.

To add the single woven thread through the hat, thread your tapestry needle with a piece of yarn about 24″ long. Starting at the back seam of the hat, weave in the yarn and tie in with a knot and then weave in and out of each stitch around one row. See photo below for exactly where you put your needle through to get the same design I’ve done. When you’re done the row fasten off and weave in any ends.

Looking for more great crochet patterns: Crochet Cat BedCrochet iPhone CaseEasy-Peasy Crochet Beanie, Crochet Infinity Scarf

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Thanks for reading!

~ Jamey

Basic Crochet Hat Pattern - Perfect for donating to hospitals.

Basic Crochet Hat Pattern – Perfect for donating to maternity and neonatal intensive care units.

Update: Here’s the pile of hats that Noelle and I took to the hospital on New Year’s day… what a positive way to start off a new year.

Hat donations

Hat donations

 

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Pickle Jar Remix – DIY Frosted Glass Vase

| Crafts & DIY, For the Home

Pickle Jar Remix - Frosted Glass Jar

Pickle Jar Remix – Frosted Glass Jar

Pickle Jar Remix – DIY Frosted Glass Vase – Pretty much every time I throw at jar into the recycling bin I feel a little bit guilty because I keep thinking I should do something with that jar.  I wish I could say I’m uber excited to save the environment or something altruistic like that but it’s a little more simplistic than that… I just like to create things.  A couple of weeks ago I found some frosted glass paint.  I didn’t have anything in mind when I picked it up but thought it may come in handy some day.  Well, that someday was yesterday when I went to toss a pickle jar into the recycling bin. I was holding the jar in my hand thinking about what a beautiful size and shape it was when I realized it would make a sweet little vase if done up nicely.  So I tracked down some white paint, the frosted glass paint, some thin tape (washi tape in this instance) and a smallish pouncer. This was a really quick project about 20 minutes all in, not including the drying time.

One last thing before I get to this DIY tutorial.  I LOVE PEONIES! We used to have huge bushes of them where I grew up in Ontario and I loved picking them for my mom when I was a little girl.  I had grown a bunch at our old house that we moved from last year.  Just this Spring I planted a number of peony tubers but then about a month or so after I planted them, my husband had a guy come over to weed all our gardens and didn’t tell me.  The guy he hired “weeded” all of my peonies.  What kind of gardener doesn’t know the weeds from the plants… deep breath.

Anyway, after that incident I’ve been in peony withdrawal so I went back to our old house and with the tenants permission (friends of ours actually) I picked a few peonies for the lovely bouquet in this photo… ah, all better now. Look at how gorgeous those flowers are!

Materials:

  • Glass paint – Americana Frosted Gloss Enamels – Frosted glass paint in white (from Michaels)
  • Craft paint – Martha Stewart Multi-Surface Satin Acrylic Craft Paint in Wedding Cake (from Michaels)
  • Small to medium size pouncer
  • Tape (I used thin washi tape)

Instructions:

  1. Soak jar in warm water to get the label off the jar and then wash it to make sure there is no paper or sticker residue left on the glass.  Dry glass thoroughly.
  2. Place your tape into the position being careful to make straight, consistently spaced lines.
  3. Using your pouncer, gently sponge on your solid colour paint (white in my case) in between the tape.  Carefully go around the outside until all the space is filled in. Allow to dry for an hour or two, then remove the tape.
  4. Now, using your frosted glass paint, dab on using your pouncer starting at the bottom and move to the top until the entire jar is covered.  I found that if I went over it again (about 5 minutes later) with a sparse second coat it had a better “frosted” appearance. Allow to dry completely.
  5. Fill jar/vase with water and beautiful flowers.
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