Posts Tagged ‘diy’

Jellyfish Friendship Bracelets – Free Printable Template

| Crafts & DIY, Kids Fun, Printables

Jelleyfish bracelet tutorial with printable template.

Jelleyfish bracelet tutorial with free printable template.

A while back, I tried to teach Noelle how to make friendship bracelets.  I used to spend hours making these when I was a kid.  It didn’t go overly well with Noelle. I’m not sure if she was still a bit too young or she just wasn’t interested. Determined to find something easier for her to make, I found some Pinterest posts on how to make woven bracelets (I wanted to give credit to one great post in particular but it’s a broken link now).  I got out an old cereal box and some embroidery thread and sat down to test it out – it worked! Inspired by this super easy friendship bracelet idea, I created a simple template that you can print out, glue onto some light cardboard (cereal boxes or pasta boxes work well), cut out and you’re ready to go.

Oh, and I have no idea what the real name is for these sorts of bracelets but Noelle and I named them Jellyfish Bracelets because as you’re making them, they look like jellyfish (see photos below).

Materials:

  • Light cardboard box that you can cut up (cereal, oatmeal or pasta boxes for example)
  • Download Template
  • Paper
  • Embroidery floss – Up to 7 colours
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Any jewellery findings if you want to make it removable, otherwise just tie the bracelet right on your wrist
Printable Jellyfish Bracelet Template

Click to download – Printable Jellyfish Bracelet Template

Instructions:

  1. Download the printable template and print onto a piece of paper
  2. Cut out one of the circles from the paper and glue onto a piece of your cardboard (make sure to get the edges of the circle covered really well with glue).  Let the glue dry completely. (If you aren’t patient enough to do the whole glue thing, you could just copy the template design directly onto the cardboard with a pen).
  3. Now cut the cardboard with the paper glued onto it around the edge of the circle to where the tips of the arrow heads are. Cut a slit in each line that has the arrow head, about the same distance as the line itself. Use the sharp end of your scissors to poke a hole in the middle, approximately the size of the circle.
  4. Now grab your embroidery floss and cut either 7 or 14 pieces (2 of each colour) all 18″ long  for adults or about 14″ for smaller kids. I find that doubling up the floss (using 14 pieces) is thicker and goes a bit faster.
  5. Knot together all the embroidery thread at one end so that there is still a little tail of ends.
  6. Careful thread the ends of all the thread through the hole so that the knot is on the back side of your template/cardboard.  Put one piece of each thread (2 pieces per slit if you’re using 14 pieces of floss) into each slit so that it’s snug into place – see Photo A.
  7. Now, turn the template so that the empty space is pointing to your chest.  Count 3 slit spaces to the left from there (approx. the 10:00 pm position if it were a clock).  Take that piece(s) out of the slit and place into the empty space that is facing your chest – see Photos B and C.
  8. Turn the template counterclockwise so that the empty space is again pointing to your chest and repeat step 7.
  9. Keep your thumb gently over the hole in the middle to make sure that the bracelet remains in position while you’re moving the threads around. You’ll also want to run your fingers through the threads underneath the template from time to time to prevent the threads from getting tangled.
  10. Eventually you’ll start seeing the bracelet appear underneath once you get going – see Photo D. Keep going until you’ve reached your desired length. Tie off the end and finish off as you please (I added some clasps so my daughter’s bracelets so she could take hers on and off but you can keep things simple and just tie the two ends of your bracelet together).

Looking for more great kids stuff:  10-minute superhero costumeprintable robot colouring page DIY I spy gamegood karma cardsfamily movie night tickets, blank faces coloring pages, indoor fairy garden

Thanks for reading!

~ Jamey

Follow this tutorial to create your own jellyfish bracelet.

Follow this tutorial to create your own jellyfish bracelet.

22 Comments

How To Photograph People Jumping

| Design & Technology, Kids Fun, Outdoors

Tips for taking jumping photographs.

Tips for taking jumping photographs.

How To Photograph People Jumping – Who doesn’t love summer days spent frolicking on the beach.  More than half of our time during the summer is spent camping at our RV on the beach.  That means a lot of time hanging out enjoying the sand, sun and waves. During the past few summer’s there I’ve taken many, many photos, especially of my daughter.  I love capturing all the moments of childhood – digging, burying, throwing, riding, running and my favourite, jumping.

People are often too scared or intimidated to shoot high action jumping photos but there are a few tricks that can help you capture the moment. Most camera’s these days have all you need to take these super fun photos.

Choose your scene

Make sure you have a simple background. Usually something that isn’t too busy so that the jumper will stand out. Also make sure you aren’t taking the photo directly into the sun – always try to get the sun behind you if possible.

Get up close and personal

The closer you can get to the person jumping, the more dramatic the photo will be and the more detail you’ll be able to capture. Often times taking the photo in portrait format (or up and down) helps make the jumper stand out better – remember to leave room at the top of your photo so that the head doesn’t get cut off.

Go low, low, low

The most dramatic and energetic jumps are photographed when the photographer is lower than the jumper. It helps to kneel, crouch or lay on the ground when taking these photos.

Study your camera

If you have a DSLR camera, use a high shutter speed if possible – if you’re not sure just keep on automatic.  If you’re using a point and shoot, test how quickly your camera actually takes the photo after you push down the shutter button.  Many point and shoots have a bit of a lag so make sure you account for this minor timing adjustment.  You can also use the sports or motion setting  if your camera comes with that setting.

Focus

Have the person stand right where you’ll be taking the photo and pre-focus your camera by pressing the shutter button halfway down to prepare for the shot.

1-2-3-JUMP

Count “1-2-3-jump” to help get the timing right for taking the photo. You may have to do this a few times to coordinate with your jumper. Remember that you want to snap the shot at the peak of the jump.

Shoot, shoot and shoot some more

The beauty of the digital camera’s is that you can take as many photos as your memory card can handle and you can delete on the spot, so take as many photos as you can… well, until your jumper runs out of steam anyway.

These quick tips will help you take great jumping photos

These quick tips will help you take great jumping photos

3 Comments

Crochet iPhone Case – Quick and Easy Pattern

| Crafts & DIY

Quick and easy iPhone case.

Quick and easy iPhone case.

Crochet iPhone Case – Lately I’ve been feeling a burning desire to start crocheting again (I think it was around Christmas the last time I picked up a hook).  At this time of year, it’s not like we need scarves, cowls or beanies so I wasn’t sure what I should make but then I saw some really cute iPhone cases on Pinterest and thought that would be a great project to get me back in the crocheting game again. I looked at a few patterns and in the end, just sort of came up with my own design.  It’s ridiculously easy and quick – it took me about an hour and I’m a pretty slow crocheter. Even beginners can handle this fun project.

Materials:

  • Size 5 bulky weight yarn in 1 or 2 colors – approx. 35 yards –  (I used Bernat Roving) 
  • Crochet hook 1 size smaller than recommended on yarn packaging (I used 5.5mm or US 9)
  • Button of your choice
  • Thread
  • Darning needle
  • Sewing needle
  • Scissors
  • Your phone (to make sure the fit is what you want)

This case will have a more structured feel and appearance if you keep the tension on this firm and tight and consistent throughout the project.

  • sl st = slip stitch
  • sc = single crochet
  • ch = chain

Click here if you have any trouble knowing or remembering which stitches these are.

Keep in mind I’m a novice pattern maker so I hope this all makes sense.

iPhone Case Pattern Instructions:

  1. Make a slip knot and then chain 6 to 8 chain stitches (ch) together. Remember to keep the tension pretty tight.  Basically you want to have the chain be the same width of your phone when the chain is stretched firmly.  If you want the case to have a snug fit, (ch) 6 but if you want it a little more loose and roomy then (ch) 7 or 8 stitches. 
  2. Round 2. Not turning your work, (sc) in the second chain from the end (the same end your hook is) and continue this in every stitch back across the entire row. 2 (sc) in the last stitch.
  3. Round 3. With your work still facing you, turn around the corner so that you’re now working into your original chain and still working right to left, 2 (sc) in the first stitch then (sc) the rest of the stitches in the row except 2(sc) in the last stitch. Repeat this for as many rows you need until you have achieved the correct width to fit the bottom of your phone (probably about 3-5 rows total depending on how snug or roomy you want your cover).  Keep your phone handy to test and make sure the fit is good.
  4. Round 4, 5 or 6 onward. 1 (sc) in each stitch for each row until you’re near the top of your phone.
  5. Second last row. Here you can either keep your yarn color the same or add your second color. Starting at one side of the case, do one more row of (sc) and then at the end of that row change to 1 (sl st) in each stitch.  When you reach the exact middle of your case, (ch) 30 stitches so that you have a long chain and then do 1 (sl st) in the stitch that your chain originated in so that the chain becomes a loop that will go over the button.  Then carry on around the rest of the row until you’re back where you started. Fasten off and weave in any loose ends with your darning needle.
  6. Put your phone in the case and pull the chained loop over.  Mark where the end of your loop falls, centered on the case, and then stitch your button on in that exact spot.

You could use this pattern for any phone or tablet, just increase a number of stitches at the beginning to accommodate for the extra width. These would make great gifts too.

17 Comments

Pickle Jar Remix – DIY Frosted Glass Vase

| Crafts & DIY, For the Home

Pickle Jar Remix - Frosted Glass Jar

Pickle Jar Remix – Frosted Glass Jar

Pickle Jar Remix – DIY Frosted Glass Vase – Pretty much every time I throw at jar into the recycling bin I feel a little bit guilty because I keep thinking I should do something with that jar.  I wish I could say I’m uber excited to save the environment or something altruistic like that but it’s a little more simplistic than that… I just like to create things.  A couple of weeks ago I found some frosted glass paint.  I didn’t have anything in mind when I picked it up but thought it may come in handy some day.  Well, that someday was yesterday when I went to toss a pickle jar into the recycling bin. I was holding the jar in my hand thinking about what a beautiful size and shape it was when I realized it would make a sweet little vase if done up nicely.  So I tracked down some white paint, the frosted glass paint, some thin tape (washi tape in this instance) and a smallish pouncer. This was a really quick project about 20 minutes all in, not including the drying time.

One last thing before I get to this DIY tutorial.  I LOVE PEONIES! We used to have huge bushes of them where I grew up in Ontario and I loved picking them for my mom when I was a little girl.  I had grown a bunch at our old house that we moved from last year.  Just this Spring I planted a number of peony tubers but then about a month or so after I planted them, my husband had a guy come over to weed all our gardens and didn’t tell me.  The guy he hired “weeded” all of my peonies.  What kind of gardener doesn’t know the weeds from the plants… deep breath.

Anyway, after that incident I’ve been in peony withdrawal so I went back to our old house and with the tenants permission (friends of ours actually) I picked a few peonies for the lovely bouquet in this photo… ah, all better now. Look at how gorgeous those flowers are!

Materials:

  • Glass paint – Americana Frosted Gloss Enamels – Frosted glass paint in white (from Michaels)
  • Craft paint – Martha Stewart Multi-Surface Satin Acrylic Craft Paint in Wedding Cake (from Michaels)
  • Small to medium size pouncer
  • Tape (I used thin washi tape)

Instructions:

  1. Soak jar in warm water to get the label off the jar and then wash it to make sure there is no paper or sticker residue left on the glass.  Dry glass thoroughly.
  2. Place your tape into the position being careful to make straight, consistently spaced lines.
  3. Using your pouncer, gently sponge on your solid colour paint (white in my case) in between the tape.  Carefully go around the outside until all the space is filled in. Allow to dry for an hour or two, then remove the tape.
  4. Now, using your frosted glass paint, dab on using your pouncer starting at the bottom and move to the top until the entire jar is covered.  I found that if I went over it again (about 5 minutes later) with a sparse second coat it had a better “frosted” appearance. Allow to dry completely.
  5. Fill jar/vase with water and beautiful flowers.
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